Archive for the ‘Kamakura’ Category

a second visit to the kamakura daibutsu   2 comments

Sunday, July 2: After enjoying ice cream while sitting in an air-conditioned ice cream parlor, Tobi and I continue to the Kamakura Daibutsu.  Tobi has never seen it before, but I have.  The first time I visited (daibutsu: the great buddha of kamakura), the skies were bright blue; today it’s overcast and hazy.  No matter.  It’s still a treat to see the famous Buddha again.

Kamakura Daibutsu

We take a lot of pictures.  Here, Tobi poses meditatively in front of the Daibutsu.

He also takes a couple of pictures of me with the Daibutsu.

me at the Daibutsu

Kamakura Daibutsu

me at the Daibutsu

I love the Buddha with the lotus flowers.

Daibutsu and lotus flowers

Daibutsu and lotus flowers

We decide to take the Enoden Line, packed as usual, back to Kamakura.  In Kamakura, we search for a restaurant.

Kamakura restaurant

We have no idea what we’re getting, but the picture looks good.

I find out later, from my Instagram friend Yukie, that what we ate was Chirashi Sushi, or “scattered sushi.” This kind of sushi apparently came on the scene along with Maki Sushi (rolled sushi) around the 18th century.  Another close translation for it is “sushi rice salad.”  The ingredients, or “gu,” are scattered on sushi rice with no rolling or shaping involved (All About Sushi Guide: Chirashi Sushi).

Chirashi Sushi, or “scattered sushi”

This is the first time I’ve had this in Japan, and I love it!

Chirashi Sushi, or “scattered sushi”

After lunch, we get back on the train and go to Kita-Kamakura, where we plan to visit Engakuji Temple.

hasadera’s hydrangea walk: the third time’s a charm   15 comments

Sunday, July 2: Today, I invite my colleague Tobi to come along with me to Hasedera Temple, which is about a 7-minute walk from the Daibutsu, or the Big Buddha. He’s been wanting to go to the Daibutsu for a long time, but hasn’t done it for whatever reason.  I’ve decided once more to try to do the hydrangea walk at Hasedera.  I tell him we must get an early start because I don’t want to miss the hydrangea walk for the third time.  I tried two times before, with no success.  You can read about those botched attempts here and here.

Even though we live in the same apartment building, I have a bicycle and Tobi doesn’t, so we agree to meet at Fuchinobe Station at 7:30 a.m. After meeting and having a brief coffee, we get on the train to Kamakura.  On the train, we sit across from this lady carrying a huge bouquet.  Tobi takes a great photo of her and allows me to share it.

on the Yokohama Line – photo by Tobias Manthey

Upon arriving at Kamakura Station, rather than pack ourselves like sardines into that ever-crowded Enoden Line, we hire a taxi for 800 yen to take us directly to Hasedera.  By the time we arrive, it’s nearly 10:00. We get our timed tickets for the hydrangea walk and find, much to our surprise, that the wait is only about 45 minutes!

floating iris garden at Hasedera

We check out the Benten-kutsu Cave while we wait.  It is here at this cave that Benzaiten and her followers of Sixteen Children are chiseled out of the rock walls. Benzaiten is the Goddess of water and wealth, and the only female among the Seven Japanese Gods of Fortune.

outside the Benten-kutsu Cave

inside the Benten-kutsu Cave

ema at the Benten-kutsu Cave

Benten-do Hall is next to Hojo-ike pond.   It houses the statue of Benzaiten with eight arms.

Benten-do Hall

We make our way up the hill, past the pond and iris garden.

pond and iris garden at Hasedera

About halfway up the hill, we stop at Jizo-do Hall, where Fukujyu is enshrined. Here, visitors can pray for easy childbirth and prosperity.  Surrounding the hall are thousands of little Jizo statutes standing in long rows. The statues are there to comfort the souls of miscarried and deceased children.  Jizo is a Buddhist saint who saves people and is especially believed to protect children.

Jizo statues at Jizo-do Hall

Jizo statues at Jizo-do Hall

Jizo statues at Jizo-do Hall

Jizo statues at Jizo-do Hall – Photo by Tobias Manthey

Jizo statues at Jizo-do Hall

Jizo statues at Jizo-do Hall

At the top of the hill, we find the Kannon-do Hall, which houses the fabulous statue of Hase Kannon.  Although Kannon is often described in English as “the Buddhist Goddess of Mercy,” it is, strictly speaking, neither masculine nor feminine.  Sadly, no photography is allowed.

Kannon-do Hall

incense burner at Kannon-do Hall

We stop to admire the hazy view of Yuigahama and Zaimokuza Beaches, as well as Sagami Bay, from the Observation Platform.  We can see the Zushi Marina and the Miura Peninsula in the distance.  It’s very hot and humid today.

View of Yuigahama and Zaimokuza Beaches and Sagami Bay from the Observation Platform

garden near the hydrangea walk entrance

garden near Kannon-do Hall

Buddha footprints – Photo by Tobias Manthey

Buddha footprints

The hydrangea walk begins near the Observation Platform, and now, at 10:45, we show our tickets and get into the line.  Luckily, the line is not nearly as long as it’s been the last couple of times I’ve been here.

map of the hydrangea walk

hillsides covered in hydrangea

hydrangea hills

As we walk up the hill of the hydrangea walk, sweat is pouring off of me.  It’s such miserable weather today!

view from the hydrangea walk

multi-armed statue

hydrangea

view of Sagami Bay from the hydrangea walk at Hasedera

view of Sagami Bay from the hydrangea walk at Hasedera

I’m finally able to have someone take a picture of me, and my hair looks horrible because of the straightening I had done yesterday.  It’s so flat!  I’m never allowed to wash my hair for two days after straightening, and after sleeping on it all night, it looks awful. 😦  Oh well, at least periodically, I like to prove I actually was in Japan. 🙂

 

 

We continue on the hydrangea walk, admiring the views, the plethora of hydrangeas, and the stone lanterns.

stone lantern among the hydrangeas

lantern amidst white hydrangeas

view over Sagami Bay

view over Sagami Bay

Japanese lady in yukata

hydrangea heaven

from a bygone era

hydrangea

Back at the bottom of the hill, near the exit to the hydrangea walk, I find this lineup of Buddhist deities.

Buddha statues

stone lantern

In the Kyozo (space for storing Buddhist scriptures), there is a rotary bookshelf called a Rinzo. It is believed that when you rotate the Rinzo once, you will receive the same virtue as when you recite the complete scriptures. There are also 18 prayer wheels called Mani-guruma which you can turn to receive virtue such as that from the Rinzo.

Rinzo- a rotary bookshelf

looking back up at the hillside

the hillside above

a rock garden with stone lantern

We go inside of Kannon-do, where we admire the amazing Kannon statue, at 30.1 feet (9.18 meters), one of the largest wooden Buddhist statues in Japan.  It has eleven heads in addition to its main one: three on the front, the right, the left, one at the top and another on the back.  Each face has a different expression, signifying that the Kannon listens to the wishes of all types of people and leads them away from distress. Hase Kannon holds a vase with lotus flowers in its left hand and is unique in that it holds a staff instead of prayer beads in its right. It stands on a stone-like base instead of a lotus flower like most eleven-headed Kannon statues.  It really is amazing to see, and I’m sorry that I’m not allowed to take a picture of it. 😦

The Sho-Kannon Bosatsu is one of the most beloved deities from old times in Japan. Kannon is known for its mercy and compassion such as a mother’s affection.  It is believed that Kannon will immediately appear to those who seek salvation in this realm.  Created by the late Mr. Seibou Kitamura, the statue is enshrined here as a symbol of peace.

statue of Sho-Kannon Bosatsu

Next to Kannon-do is Amida-do Hall, where the golden seated statue of Amida Nyorai, one of Kamakura’s six principal statues of Amida Buddha, is enshrined.  According to legend, in 1194, Minamoto no Yoritomo, who was the first shogun of the Kamakura Shogunate of Japan, commissioned the statue for warding off evil.  In later years, people came to believe it would expel evil spirits and offer protection against misfortune.

statue of Amida Nyorai

ema at Hasedera

ema at Hasedera

The Shoro Belfry was constructed in 1955 to house a massive bronze bell, created in 1264 and recast in 1984.  Following the Buddhist tradition, the bell is run 108 times around midnight on New Year’s Eve to dispel the 108 sufferings of humanity.

Shoro Belfry

This shrine was rebranded Inari-sha in later years, although it was originally dedicated to “Kojin” (god of the cooking stove and fire). According to the legend of the Kannon statue, the deity appeared floating on the sea, drifting ashore by the guidance of “kakigara” (oyster shells) attached to the statue.  This Inari-sha was established to enshrine the Kakigara and to receive the divine guidance of Kannon.

Inari-sha (Kakigara Inari)

“kakigara” (oyster shells)

Inari-sha (Kakigara Inari)

“kakigara” (oyster shells)

“kakigara” (oyster shells)

Near the Benten-do Hall and Benten-kutsu Cave is a pretty rock garden.

rock garden at Hasedera

The Japanese rock garden (枯山水 karesansui) or “dry landscape” garden, often called a zen garden, creates a miniature stylized landscape through carefully composed arrangements of rocks, water features, moss, pruned trees and bushes, and uses gravel or sand that is raked to represent ripples in water (Wikipedia: Japanese rock garden).

rock garden at Hasedera

rock garden at Hasedera

Near Benten-do Hall, one can pick up a fortune which appears blank; the fortune appears when placed in a concrete water bowl much like a bird bath. My friend Yukie from Instagram later translates my fortune for me:  I have moderate luck (chu-kichi).  In different categories, my fortune is such: Romantic relationships: Being kind to others will bring you happiness. Learning: Go back to your basics again! Health: You should relax with aromatherapy tonight!  Your work: Be more careful than usual.  One step at a time.

It’s funny about the work fortune, because at work, the university barely turns on any air conditioning, making the work situation unbearable. It’s miserably hot and humid in Japan, and I’m not tolerating it well.  I am about to explode over the situation, and have even seriously considered hopping on a plane and going home!  So, the admonition to “be more careful than usual. One step at a time” is an appropriate warning for me to calm down about the situation. 🙂

my fortune for today

Daikoku-do Hall houses the statue of Daikokuten.

inside Daikoku-do Hall

Daikokuten is one of the Seven Japanese Gods of Fortune. He is considered the god of wealth (or more specifically, the harvest), or of the household, particularly the kitchen. He is often prayed to for an abundant harvest, success in life and business. Recognized by his wide face and beaming smile, he is often portrayed holding a golden mallet and standing or sitting on bales of rice (Must Love Japan: Hasedera Temple).  People are allowed to touch this “Sawari Daikoku” to receive good fortune.

statue of Daikokuten

By the time Tobi and I leave Hasedera, it’s 11:40, and we walk down the street toward the Daibutsu, which I’ll now see for the second time. 🙂  We stop in one of the shops for an ice cream treat, and then we’re on our way.

(All information about Hasedera is from the temple’s tourist brochure, unless otherwise stated).

myōhonji: in search of the elusive mossy steps   8 comments

Saturday, June 17:  By the time I make it to Myōhonji, in the southeastern hills of Kamakura, it’s 3:40 and I realize that the chance of getting back to Hasedera by 5:00 is very slim. I seriously doubt I’ll have the energy to tackle that crowded Enoden Line to get back there; nor do I feel energetic enough to even stand in the line to see the hydrangeas.  Instead, I take my time trying to find some beautiful mossy steps that my Japanese friend Yukie posted on her Instagram feed.

Myōhonji is one of several temples of the Nichiren sect of Japanese Buddhism; it was founded by Hiki Yoshimoto in 1260 (japan-guide.com: Myohonji Temple).

gate to Myōhonji

Myōhonji

The Nichiren sect of Buddhism was founded by Nichiren in 1253. The sect was exceptional due to its intolerant stance towards other Buddhist sects. Nichiren Buddhism still has many millions of followers today, and several “new religions” are based on Nichiren’s teachings. (japan-guide.com: Buddhism)

gate at Myōhonji

Myōhonji

There is an extensive cemetery on the temple grounds and I go exploring every nook and cranny in search of the mossy steps.

cemetery at Myōhonji

cemetery at Myōhonji

I find one set of somewhat mossy steps, but they are not the ones I saw in the photographs.

somewhat mossy steps at Myōhonji

I continue to search, but, while I admire the pretty cemetery, I can’t seem to find those steps. 🙂

Coming down a path from one section of the cemetery at Myōhonji, I see this leafy path and wonder if the steps might be found here.  I wander down the path for a bit, but I don’t find them.

a leafy path

A statue of Nichiren stands to the left of the main hall on the temple grounds.

statue of Nichiren

statue of Nichiren

I walk up some other non-mossy hydrangea-lined steps to another section of the cemetery to no avail.

stairway to heaven

cemetery at Myōhonji

stairway lined with hydrangeas

cemetery at Myōhonji

cemetery at Myōhonji

Myōhonji

Myōhonji

I love the colorful carvings over the door of the gate.

gate at Myōhonji

If I can’t take pictures of mossy steps, I might as well take some fern photos.

ferns, but no moss

I follow another path, but it only leads to another small shrine.

hydrangea path at Myōhonji

bicycle in the bushes at Myōhonji

small shrine at Myōhonji

hydrangea pathway

Myōhonji

In the end, I give up.  I can’t find the mossy steps anywhere. It’s 4:20 when I finish at Myōhonji, and though it might be possible to make it back to Hasedera, it will be too much of a rush. I have a long walk back to Kamakura Station, plus I have to wait again for that frustrating Enoden Line and then climb up that hill through all the crowds at Hasedera.  I’m simply to hot, tired and exhausted after visiting Meigetsu-in, hiking the Daibutsu Hiking Course, visiting two temples along the way, seeing the Great Buddha and visiting Hasedera and Myōhonji.

At Kamakura Station, I get on the train to go back home.  After arriving at Fuchinobe, as I ride my bicycle home, I decide I’ll stop in at Curry Naan to have dinner.  I don’t feel like cooking after today, and I’m really sick of eating Bento boxes from the 7-11. I enjoy my regular vegetable curry and a huge piece of naan.  For some bizarre reason, the beer is filled to the brim with ice cubes.  I’ve never encountered that here before!  I’m paying for mostly ice and very little beer. 🙂

Vegetable curry at Curry Naan

This has been one very exhausting day!

Total steps (including Meitgetsu-in, the Daibutsu Hiking course, the Great Buddha, Hasedera, and Myōhonji): 23,379 (9.91 miles).

I’m wiped out!  Luckily it’s supposed to rain tomorrow, so I can finally have a relaxing day. 🙂

 

 

hasedera temple: attempt #2 at the hydrangea walk   7 comments

Saturday, June 17:  It’s 2:15 by the time I arrive at Hasedera.  As I walk through the gate, I’m given a ticket with a number on it for the hydrangea walk.  I ask, “About how long is the wait?”  The young man tells me, with a pained look on his face, that it will be about 3 hours.  He says, “But you can leave and go do something else, and come back later if you like.”

I can’t believe it.  I have come all the way back to Hasedera at what I thought was a reasonable hour, and now I have to wait 3 hours.  What will I do for 3 hours? If I had known the wait would be this long, I would have come directly here, gotten the ticket, and then gone back to see the Great Buddha.  But now, I’ve seen the Great Buddha, and I even enjoyed an ice cream, and now there is nothing more of interest to do in this area.  I’m hot, tired and sweaty and I don’t want to waste all that time sitting around doing nothing.  Feeling defeated, I take a quick walk around the temple grounds while I ponder what to do.

I already attempted to do the hydrangea walk at Hasedera last Saturday, on June 10, and wrote about the temple here:  a hopeful trip to hasedera (attempt #1): too late for the hydrangea walk 😦  There isn’t much point to me going over the historical details of this temple again, so if you’d like to know more, feel free to check out my previous post. 🙂

gate at Hasedera

I stroll around the grounds, enjoying the stone lanterns and the iris pond, the Buddha and Jizo figures, the scattered hydrangeas, and the main hall.

pond at Hasedera

a line of holy characters

hydrangea

iris gardens in the pond

iris pond

hydrangea

Jizo statues

Jizo statues

Fukujyu Jizo

When I get to the top of the hill near the main hall, I find, once again, the cute Buddha footprints in a bowl of water.

Buddha footprints

I can also see the queue to the hydrangea walk, which I will have to wait 3 hours to join!

the queue for the hydrangea walk

The saving grace to this visit to Hasedera is the clear view over Sagami Bay.  The view is better than it was the first time I was here.

view over Sagami Bay from Hasedera

view over Sagami Bay from Hasedera

view over Sagami Bay from Hasedera

At Kannon-dō, the Main hall, people are sprawled out all over the steps.  I can only assume they’re waiting for their turn to enter the queue for the hydrangea walk.

Kannon-dō (Main hall)

Kannon-dō (Main hall)

Kannon-dō (Main hall)

I’m certainly not going to sit around on the steps at Hasedera’s Main Hall for 3 hours!  I originally had in mind to visit another temple in Kamakura proper, Myōhonji, which supposedly has some beautiful mossy steps. My Instagram friend Yukie posted some pictures of the steps and I was hoping to visit the temple after leaving Hasedera.  Since I have three hours to wait, I decide I will go to Kamakura proper, visit the temple, and if I have enough energy, I’ll return by 5:00.

I realize as soon as I arrive at Hase Station that the Enoden, or Enoshima Electric Railway, will again be a challenge.  The station platform is packed.  I wait in the sweltering heat with the always-patient Japanese.  Finally, the train arrives, already packed.  A few people from the platform are able to get on the train.  I have to wait another 10 minutes for the next train, and this time, I am the last one to get on the train and the doors can barely close as I hold my breath to pull my nose out of the doors’ trajectory.

When I get to Kamakura, I walk toward Myōhonji, making a brief stop at Daigyoji Temple to admire the hydrangeas in the garden.  As if I haven’t seen enough hydrangeas today!

entrance to Daigyoji Temple

hydrangea at Daigyoji Temple

I continue to Myōhonji Temple in search of those mossy steps. 🙂

 

 

 

 

daibutsu: the great buddha of kamakura   6 comments

Saturday, June 17: After leaving the relative serenity of the Daibutsu Hiking Course and being thrust out alongside the busy road, I stop at the first available vending machine and buy a bottle of water.  I’ve grown fond of a particular brand of flavored sweetened water, and as is usual, I get the orange flavor.  Hot, tired and parched, I gulp it down in several minutes.

By 1:00, I’m at Kotoku-in Temple and in front of the Nio-mon Gate.  Kotoku-in belongs to the traditional Buddhist Jodo Sect founded by the priest Honen (1133–1212). He was a devotee of Amitabha, Buddha of the Western Pure Land, whose vow is to liberate all beings, irrespective of sex, age or social standing, regardless of whether the individual has engaged in good or evil deeds in their lives. According to the Jodo Sect belief system, one only needs to chant the nenbutsu to receive Amitabha’s protection and be reborn in his Pure Land. The nenbutsu is “Namu Amida Butsu” (I take refuge in Amitabha Buddha). (Kotoku-in: The Teachings of Kotoku-in).

gate to Kotoku-in Temple

The main draw of Kotoku-in is the Kamakura Daibutsu, or the Great Buddha of Kamakura. A colossal copper image of Amida Buddha (the Buddha of Eternal Light), it is unusual among Japanese Buddhist statues in that it sits in the open air. Designated a National Treasure by the Japanese government, the Buddha is some 11.3 meters tall and weighs around 121 tons. Though in size it falls short of the Great Buddha of Todai-ji Temple at Nara (an image of Rushana-butsu [Vairochana Buddha]), it essentially retains its original form; as such it serves as an example of Japanese historical Buddhist art (Kotoku-in: The Great Buddha).

Directly behind the Great Buddha are the hills of the Daibutsu Hiking Course that I walked over to get here.

the Great Buddha at Hase

The Buddha sits on a lotus throne on a stone platform, holding its hands in its lap, palms upward and thumbs touching; this is the mudra (position) of “Steadfastness of Faith.”  Its serene face and half-closed eyes reveal the Buddha’s calm nature.  This serenity should be the goal of the true believer.

Daibutsu, the Great Buddha

the Great Buddha

Daibutsu

the Great Buddha

Warazori, traditional Japanese straw sandals, hang on a corridor wall facing the Great Buddha. According to Kotoku-in’s website, they were a 1951 gift from the Matsuzaka Children’s Club of Hitachi-Ota City (Ibaraki Prefecture). As Japan was still recovering from the ravages of World War II, the sandals were given with the wish that “the Great Buddha would don them to walk around Japan, bringing happiness to the people.” Since 1956, the Matsuzaka Children’s Club has continued to weave these giant warazori and present them to Kotoku-in once every three years.

Buddha’s sandals

Daibutsu

the Great Buddha

girls in yukata with the Great Buddha

lotus and Buddha

me at the Great Buddha

The Kangetsu-do Hall is believed to have been part of the imperial palace in mid-15th century Hanyang (present-day Seoul), Korea. The Hall houses a standing image of Avalokiteshvara Bodhisattva (Kannon Bosatsu), probably from the late Edo period.

Kangetsu-do Hall

Hydrangeas are all the rage here in Kamakura, and Kotoku-in is no exception.  Near the Kangetsu-do Hall are some pretty pink blooms.

hydrangea at the Great Buddha

It’s only about a 7 minute walk from the Great Buddha to Hasedera Temple, so I walk down the street to see if I can make it into the queue for the hydrangea walk. I was too late to get in the queue last Saturday because I arrived after 4:00, having visited Enoshima during the earlier part of the day. On the way, I’m enticed inside a cozy little air-conditioned ice cream shop, where I treat myself to an ice-cream cone.

The ice cream is a wonderful refreshment, as is the break from the heat.  I love the churro stuck into the ice cream; it takes me back to memories of Spain.

an ice cream treat to beat the heat

After finishing my ice cream at 2:00, I continue my walk to Hasedera Temple, where I’m certain I’ll finally get to do the hydrangea walk. 🙂

the daibutsu hiking course: a love shrine and a money-washing shrine   8 comments

Saturday, June 17: After leaving Meigetsu-in at 10:40 a.m., I go in search of the Daibutsu Hiking Course, a 3km trail which begins at the steps just up the lane from the pretty temple, Jochi-ji.  The trail connects Kita-Kamakura with the Daibutsu, or Great Buddha, in Hase.  I begin the hike at 11:00, thinking the trail can’t possibly be that difficult, or that far.  I am quickly disavowed of this idea.

the beginning of the Daibutsu Hiking Course

The dirt trail climbs up and down over hilly terrain and through dense forest, over exposed serpentine tree roots and rocks.  Most of the time the trail is clearly marked, but at one point, several small groups are standing at a trail juncture not knowing where to go.  Luckily we’re directed by a passer-by to take the path to the left.  It’s hot and humid in the forest and with all the climbing, it’s not long before I’m covered in a layer of sweat.

through the woods

After a while, I come upon a clearing with picnic tables and, off to the side, Kuzuharaoka Shrine, a love shrine lined with rows of blooming hydrangeas.

hydrangeas at Kuzuharaoka Shrine

hydrangeas at Kuzuharaoka Shrine

There are stacks of heart-shaped ema, wooden plaques on which people write their wishes or prayers.

heart ema at Kuzuharaoka Shrine

Kuzuharaoka Shrine has a miniature version of Meoto Iwa, or Married Couple Rocks.  Meoto Iwa, a couple of small rocky stacks found in the sea off Futami, Mie, Japan, are joined by a shimenawa (a heavy rope of rice straw); they are considered sacred by worshippers at the neighboring Futami Okitama Shrine. According to legend, the rocks celebrate the union in marriage of man and woman (Wikipedia: Meoto Iwa).

Kuzuharaoka Shrine

Kuzuharaoka Shrine

In front of the shrine is a small pond with pretty irises.

irises at Kuzuharaoka Shrine

irises at Kuzuharaoka Shrine

iris bud at Kuzuharaoka Shrine

Kuzuharaoka Shrine

There are some beautiful hydrangeas here, and it is quite deserted compared to the crowded Meigetsu-in!

I love how the path to Kuzuharaoka Shrine is lined with colorful hydrangeas.

pathway to Kuzuharaoka Shrine

Kuzuharaoka Shrine

pathway to Kuzuharaoka Shrine

Kuzuharaoka Shrine

dragon at Kuzuharaoka Shrine

marker at Kuzuharaoka Shrine

hydrangea at Kuzuharaoka Shrine

Kuzuharaoka Shrine

Kuzuharaoka Shrine

Kuzuharaoka Shrine

After spending quite some time admiring the hydrangeas at this quiet little shrine, I sit at one of the picnic tables in the adjoining park and eat a sandwich I bought at a Kita-Kamakura Family Mart before starting the hike.

After walking quite a while up and over hills and stumbling over more exposed rocks and boulders, I find a fork in the path.  One sign indicates that if I go left, I can visit Zeniarai Benzaiten Ugafuku Jinja Shrine, better known as the “money washing temple.”  To the right is the path to Daibutsu.  It’s a long downhill detour to the shrine, but it is well worth going despite knowing I’ll have to climb back up that hill to get back on the Daibutsu Trail.

The shrine was founded around 1185 by Minamoto Yoritomo (1147-99), although the present buildings date from some time after the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923. He built the shrine after a god appeared to him in a dream and advised him to build a shrine to bring peace to the country.  The dream occurred on the day of the snake, in the month of the snake, in the year of the snake.  Because of the timing, the shrine was later dedicated to the Benten, a Buddhist goddess associated with snakes (japan-guide.com: Zeniarai Benten Shrine).

The shrine was originally dedicated to the kami Ugafukujin, whose symbol is a snake with a human head.  Kami are spirits worshipped in the Shinto religion and can be elements of the landscape or forces of nature, as well as beings and the qualities that these beings express; they can include the spirits of venerated dead persons (Wikipedia: Zeniarai Benzaiten Ugafuku Shrine).

The entrance is through a tunnel carved out of a natural stone cliff topped with moss, foliage and trees.

entrance to Zeniarai Benzaiten

The tunnel continues through a line of torii gates on the other side of the cave entrance.

torii gates at Zeniarai Benzaiten

Sadly I can’t find the significance of the rooster ema at Zeniarai Benzaiten Ugafuku Jinja Shrine.

ema at Zeniari Benzaiten

Zeniarai Benten Shrine fuses elements of Buddhism and Shinto.  Many other shrines were stripped of their Buddhist connections when the Meiji government attempted to separate Shinto from Buddhism.

Worshippers are advised to get a set of three candles and incense sticks from the shrine office, and to borrow a basket. At the main shrine, they should light the first candle with the big candle there and put it on the candleholder, and place incense sticks in the incense burner. They should bow twice, clap their hands twice and bow once again to pray (jntoJapan: the official guide: Zeniarai Benten Shrine).

Zeniarai Benzaiten

incense at Zeniarai Benzaiten

Next, visitors are advised to go into the cave, put the second candle on the candleholder, and wash money in the basket by pouring the holy water on it with a ladle (jntoJapan: the official guide: Zeniarai Benten Shrine). It is variously said that money will double or multiply if washed in this stream, and by the number of people who are here washing their money, it seems many hope this will actually happen.

inside the cave at Zeniarai Benzaiten

money-washing at Zeniarai Benzaiten

shrine inside the cave at Zeniarai Benzaiten

origami cranes in the cave

origami cranes

activity in the money-washing cave

ema at Zeniarai Benzaiten

waterfall at Zeniarai Benzaiten

Visitors should then offer prayers at Shichifuku-jinja Shrine, which is said to have power to bring prosperity in business, and put the last candle there.

shrine at Zeniarai Benzaiten

creature in the garden

Next, worshippers should climb the stairs and visit Kaminomizu-jingu Shrine and Shimonomizu-jingu Shrine to pray.

shrine at Zeniarai Benzaiten

shrine at Zeniarai Benzaiten

torii at Zeniarai Benzaiten

ema at Zeniarai Benzaiten

Finally I leave the money-washing temple and climb the steep hill back to the Daibutsu hiking trail, where I continue my walk over undulating terrain.  Strangely, I find this rather Western-looking house right along the trail.

a house along the Daibutsu Hiking Course

I find a nice view of Sagami Bay from the mountain trail.

view of Sagami Bay and Hase from the Daibutsu Hiking Course

About an hour and a half after beginning the hike, I make my descent from the mountains and by 12:30, I’m on the road leading to Daibutsu, the Great Buddha.

 

 

 

meigetsu-in: the temple of the clear moon (aka the hydrangea temple)   12 comments

Saturday, June 17:  This Saturday morning, I get up early to tackle an ambitious quest. My plan is to arrive in Kita-Kamakura by 9:00, visit the Hydrangea Temple Meigetsu-in, then take the Daibutsuzaka Hiking Course to the Great Buddha of Hase, called Daibutsu. After that, I plan to go to Hasedera for the second time to hopefully make it on the hydrangea walk.

It’s a hot day today, and I have a lot of walking ahead of me. Little do I know how exhausting it will be.  I get a bit of a later start than I intend, arriving at Kita-Kamakura at around 8:45.  When I walk out of the station, the crowds are already thick.  People seem to be in some kind of slow-moving queue, but I don’t think it can be a queue for Meigetsu-in because a sign indicates it is a half kilometer away.  At a certain point the loose queue takes a sharp left at a road where the sign points to Meigetsu-in. At that time, it dawns on me that these people are in fact in a queue for the temple.  People have been walking to the right of the queue and I’ve just been happily following along.  But at the point where the road turns left, the people I’m following peel off to the right and I realize I should have been in the queue.  I hope I can just blend in and join the queue at this juncture; I keep my head down and merge in, hoping I won’t arouse anyone’s ire. The Japanese are generally too polite to say anything.  I feel bad, but there is no way I’m going to go back to the end of that queue upon my belated realization.

Still.  Even though I join the queue at this juncture, it’s still another quarter kilometer to the temple. It’s already hot and humid, and the queue is moving slowly.  I’ve come a long way and I’m not about to turn around and give up, so I will myself to be patient and just go with the flow. It’s hard!  Patience and crowd-tolerance have never been virtues of mine. 🙂

Finally, at about 9:15, I pass through the entrance to Fugenzan Meigetsu-in (福源山明月院), a Rinzai Zen temple of the Kenchō-ji school (Wikipedia: Meigetsu-in). Meigetsu-in was founded in 1160 as the Meigetsu-an (Bright Moon Hermitage) by Yamanouchi Tsunetoshi for the repose of the soul of his father Toshimichi, who died in the Battle of Heiji the previous year.  This battle was part of the struggle for power between the Taira and Minamoto clans in the late Heian Period.

Meigetsu-in, the Temple of the Clear Moon

Meigetsu-in later became part of a larger temple complex called Zenkoji, which was abolished during anti-Buddhist movements soon after the Meiji Restoration, leaving only Meigetsu-in to remain as an individual temple today (JapanGuide.com: Meigetsuin).

The main object of worship is the Kannon Bodhisattva, the deity of compassion. This bodhisattva is variably portrayed in different cultures as either female or male (from the Meigetsu-in brochure).

hydrangea at Meigetsu-in

Famous for its hydrangea that bloom during June’s rainy season, it’s also known as Ajisaidera, The Temple of Hydrangeas. About 95% of the hydrangea here are of the Hime Ajisai (“Princess Hydrangea”) variety; they are thus named because of their pretty blue colors.

hydrangea heaven

blue hydrangea

Though the hydrangeas are beautiful, I am annoyed by the crowds, which make for slow going.  It is also nearly impossible to get pictures with the hydrangeas and the temple buildings together, which is the point of coming here.  I could see hydrangeas anywhere, but to see and enjoy them in this setting, in the midst of the temple complex, is the enticement for being here. However, it’s a challenge to take photos without people in them.

I love the ema at Meigetsu-in with their painted hydrangeas.

ema at Meigetsu-in

ema at Meigetsu-in

Buddha cradling hydrangeas

hydrangea ema

The founder’s hall (Soyudo) is a thatched roof building that enshrines the temple’s founder and stores mortuary tablets of the succeeding head priests (JapanGuide.com: Meigetsuin).

Founder’s Hall (Soyudo)

water purification

hydrangea love by the Buddha

I love how the statues wear blue bibs and have hydrangeas artfully arranged around them.

hydrangeas at Meigetsu-in

Buddhist dignitaries

Buddhist dignitaries and hydrangeas

Buddhist figures

In the back of Meigetsu-in’s lush temple grounds stands the main hall (Hojo). The building features a nice circular window, which frames the scenery of the inner garden behind it. Sadly there is a huge crowd around the hall and a long queue to take a photo of the circular window.  Maybe if I have time, I can come back when hydrangea season is over and get a photo of this.

The Main Hall

The inner garden is known for its irises and is open to visitors only during two periods of about two weeks per year: in June when the irises are in bloom, and in late November/early December when the autumn colors are at their best (JapanGuide.com: Meigetsuin)

raked sand in the inner garden

pond in the inner garden

the inner garden

iris in the inner garden

irises

irises

I enjoy walking around the iris garden; I find a little waterfall on an adjacent path.

waterfall in the inner garden

From the inner garden, where the crowds are not so thick because of the additional entrance fee, I can see the round window of the Main Hall from the back side.  The round shape of the window means to be complete or perfect in Buddhist terminology.

the round window in the Main Hall – view from inner garden

the inner garden

Back in the main temple grounds, I make my way slowly to the entrance of the temple.  It’s slow going with the crowds and the many times I must stop to take photos. 🙂

There’s also a pretty bamboo grove at Meigetsu-in that towers overhead and glows in the sunlight.

bamboo forest at Meigetsu-in

bamboo looming

Oh, the hydrangeas at Meigetsu-in!  They’re so beautiful; I guess it’s no wonder Tokyo residents come out in droves to see them.

hydrangeas

hydrangeas

hydrangeas

hydrangeas

When I’m finally able to get a photo of a shrine at Meigetsu-in, there are no hydrangeas in sight!

shrine at Meigetsu-in

Due to the temple’s name’s connection to the moon (Meigetsu literally means “bright moon”; and phonetically can also mean “harvest moon”), rabbits are associated with it in relation to the Japanese folklore of a rabbit pounding a rice cake on the moon. Accordingly, rabbit designs are found on some of the temple’s decorations, while a few real rabbits are kept in cages on the temple grounds (JapanGuide.com: Meigetsuin).

rabbit at Meigetsu-in

rabbits at Meigetsu-in

At long last, I’m released from the crowds at Meigetsu-in.  Now I need to find the beginning of the Daibutsu Hiking Course, a 3km wooded trail that connects Kita-Kamakura with the Daibutsu in Hase, and passes several small, quiet temples and shrines.

 

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