yokohama: yamate bluff   3 comments

Sunday, July 23: I have wanted to return to Yokohama to visit the Yamate Bluff for a long time.  After visiting Ofuna and the bamboo garden at Hokokuji Temple in Kamakura, I head to Ishikawacho Station on the JR Negishi Line.  Frankly, I’m exhausted from my busy day yesterday, as well as my outings today, but I’m determined to visit at least a small bit of this place.  I probably could spend a whole day here, but alas, it’s not to be.

For most of the Edo Period (1603-1867), Japan isolated itself from the outside world.  When the period of isolation ended after the 1850s, Yokohama was one of the few port towns where foreigners were allowed to reside.  Many traders looking to find business and profits in the newly opened country moved into the hills of the Yamate area, known as “The Bluff.”  Most of the homes and buildings in this residential district for Westerners were built after the Kanto Earthquake of 1923; today, some of them are designated as historical sites.  Yamate is now mainly a hilly residential area with leafy parks, international schools and churches.  It is still a residential area for Westerners.

It’s 3:23 when I make my way up a very steep hill to Bluff No. 18, a building sitting pretty in the Yamate Italian Garden.  It was first built at the end of the Taisho period (1912-1926) as a foreigners’ residence after the Great Kanto Earthquake. After World War II and until 1991, the house served as the parish house of the Yamate Catholic Church; it was moved to its current location and restored in 1993.

Bluff No. 18: Museum of Bluff Area Housing

I have a great view of colorful Yokohama from the Bluff.

View of Yokohama from the Bluff

Bluff No. 18: Museum of Bluff Area Housing

The lifestyle in a foreigner’s home during the reconstruction period after the Great Kanto Earthquake is recreated inside the house.  Reproduced classic Yokohama-style furniture reflects the interiors of that day.

Dining room in the museum

Living room in the Museum

sailing ship in the museum

bedroom in the museum

The Diplomat’s House served as the residence of Uchida Sadatsuchi (1865-1942), a diplomat of the Meiji government, who held various important positions such as Ambassador to Turkey and Consulate General in New York. The house was originally built in the American Victorian style at Nanpeidai in the Shibuya Ward of Tokyo by the American architect James Gardiner.  It was moved to the Italian Garden and designated as a National Important Cultural Property in 1997.

The Uchidas’ Former Residence: Home of a Diplomat

The Uchidas’ Former Residence & Yamate Italian Hill Garden

The Uchidas’ Former Residence

I’m not sure what this blue building is, but it sure is pretty.

Universal Arts

There are many more historical sites in the former foreign settlement of Yamate, but I’m hot and exhausted and it’s getting late in the day.  I’m still hoping to see the Foreigner’s Cemetery, but first I have to walk down Motomachi Shopping Street, which runs parallel to the Nakamura River. The street served the needs of the first foreign residents of Yokohama, and introduced many products to Japan.

Motomachi shopping street

Nowadays it seems similar to other shopping streets in Japan but with a slightly European feel. There are a large number of high-end fashion shops, hair salons, florists, home decor and souvenir shops, as well as cafes and restaurants.

Florist on Motomachi shopping street

Florist on Motomachi shopping street

Motomachi shopping street

Motomachi shopping street

Motomachi shopping street

Motomachi shopping street

Motomachi shopping street

By the time I arrive at the Foreigners’ Cemetery, it’s 4:09, and I’m kindly informed by an older gentleman at the gate that the cemetery closed at 4:00. He allows me to take a photo of two tombstones and then I have to be on my way.

The cemetery dates back to 1854, when a sailor, Robert Williams, on Commodore Perry’s flagship The Mississippi died after a fall on the ship’s second voyage to Japan. Commodore Perry, the American navy officer who forced Japan to open its ports, asked permission from the Japanese shogunal authorities to bury that sailor on a hill overlooking the water and to provide a resting place for any future Americans who died in Japan. A few months later, a couple of Russian sailors were buried as well.  In 1861, part of the grounds of Zotokuin Temple were set aside and have since become the Yokohama Foreign General Cemetery.  Today, a small section of the 4,200 graves can be visited, and the inscriptions often offer an interesting glimpse into the life of the interred (japan-guide.com: Yamate and Motomachi and Japan Visitor: Yamate the Bluff District Yokohama).

Yokohama Foreign General Cemetery

The worst thing about my unfortunate arrival time at the cemetery is that I had to climb a very steep hill to get here, so I’m sweaty, hot and irritable. I decide it’s time to call it a day.  It’s a shame I won’t have time to see all of Yamate Bluff, but at least I have a general idea of what it’s like.

I make my way back to Motomachi Shopping Street and the train station through the largest park in Yamate, the Harbor View Park, which is named after the view that the park affords onto the water and the Yokohama Bay Bridge.

view of Yokohama from Harbor View Park

view of Yokohama from Harbor View Park

view of Yokohama from Harbor View Park

view of Yokohama from Harbor View Park

windmill in Harbor View Park

Harbor View Park

Harbor View Park

On Motomachi Shopping Street, I stop in for a rest and an iced coffee at a cute little cafe.  Then I get on the train and return home to Fuchinobe to prepare for my last day of class tomorrow. I can’t believe my time in Japan is almost over. 😦

Total steps today: 15,884 (6.73 miles)

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3 responses to “yokohama: yamate bluff

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  1. Hardly time to shop, Cathy! Whatever are things coming to? 🙂 🙂

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