tokyo: mori art museum, tokyo city view, and the aldgate british pub   15 comments

Saturday, July 22:  I arrive at Azabu-juban Station and I know I need to walk quite some distance, but I have no idea in what direction to go.  Instead of wasting a lot of time, I take a taxi, and it’s a good thing I do.  It’s quite a long ride to the Mori Art Museum. I’m rushed for time since I need to meet Graham at 5:00, and it’s 3:30 when I arrive at the museum.  I need to finish seeing everything by 4:30, at which time I need to catch a train to Shibuya.  The Mori Art Museum is on the 53rd floor, so I head upstairs, where I find a monstrous mammoth hanging over the entrance.

Entrance to the Mori Art Museum

The special exhibit at the museum is SUNSHOWER: Contemporary Art from Southeast Asia 1980s to Now. The exhibit runs from July 5 – October 23, 2017. According to the museum’s website:  With its total population counting around 600 million, multi-ethnic, multi-lingual, multi-faith Southeast Asia has nurtured a truly dynamic and diverse culture. Contemporary art from the emerging economic powerhouse of Southeast Asia is currently earning widespread international attention. The “sunshower” – rain falling from clear skies – is an intriguing yet frequently seen meteorological phenomenon in Southeast Asia, and serves as a metaphor for the vicissitudes of the region. This exhibition, the largest-ever in scale, seeks to explore the many practices of contemporary art in Southeast Asia since 1980s from 9 different perspectives. It aims to showcase its inconceivable dynamism of Southeast Asia that is somewhat nostalgic yet extraordinarily new (Mori Art Museum: About the Exhibition).

I only have the names of some of the installations and pieces, and only some of the artists, because I simply don’t have enough time to note all the details.  I’m in a rush, so I take pictures and move along.  This is the first museum I’ve visited in Japan where photography is allowed.

metal rods

montage of signs

sign montage

dwelling

Below is a “large-scale collage of overwhelming density that fixes its gaze on what is made, what is destroyed, and what is preserved in Malaysia, thereby questioning the ways of the nation-state” (SUNSHOWER: Highlights).

Liew Kung Yu (b.1960) Malaysia
City of Towering Columns (from the series “Proposals for My Country”)
2009
Photo Montage 213 x 575 cm (This photograph is licensed under “Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivative Works 2.1 Japan.”)

Liew Kung Yu (b.1960) Malaysia
City of Towering Columns (from the series “Proposals for My Country”)
2009
Photo Montage 213 x 575 cm (This photograph is licensed under “Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivative Works 2.1 Japan.”)

Liew Kung Yu (b.1960) Malaysia
City of Towering Columns (from the series “Proposals for My Country”)
2009
Photo Montage 213 x 575 cm (This photograph is licensed under “Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivative Works 2.1 Japan.”)

Liew Kung Yu (b.1960) Malaysia
City of Towering Columns (from the series “Proposals for My Country”)
2009
Photo Montage 213 x 575 cm (This photograph is licensed under “Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivative Works 2.1 Japan.”)

Liew Kung Yu (b.1960) Malaysia
City of Towering Columns (from the series “Proposals for My Country”)
2009
Photo Montage 213 x 575 cm (This photograph is licensed under “Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivative Works 2.1 Japan.”)

Liew Kung Yu (b.1960) Malaysia
City of Towering Columns (from the series “Proposals for My Country”)
2009
Photo Montage 213 x 575 cm (This photograph is licensed under “Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivative Works 2.1 Japan.”)

Since I’ve traveled extensively in Southeast Asia, I am captivated by these photos of Asian dwellings.

I’m not really sure of the significance of this exhibit of building tools.

I’m sorry I can’t give any details about these fascinating collages made from newspapers and magazines.

This installation, called “Words and Possible Movement” is by Jompet Kuswidananto (2013).

Words and Possible Movement – Jompet Kuswidananto 2013 (This photograph is licensed under “Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivative Works 2.1 Japan.”)

I saw something like these mesh shapes in the Renwick Gallery in Washington.

shapes

amorphous shapes

ping-pong table

According to SUNSHOWER: Highlights: “More than 1,000 wind chimes jangle in the gallery space.  These colorful plastic decorations speak of the festive nature of Southeast Asia and a global economy supported by mass production, as they deliver a palpable vibration from which we sense signs of change.”

Stormy Weather by Felix Bacolor of The Philippines 2009 (This photograph is licensed under “Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivative Works 2.1 Japan.”)

Stormy Weather by Felix Bacolor of The Philippines 2009 (This photograph is licensed under “Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivative Works 2.1 Japan.”)

Stormy Weather by Felix Bacolor of The Philippines 2009 (This photograph is licensed under “Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivative Works 2.1 Japan.”)

Stormy Weather by Felix Bacolor of The Philippines 2009 (This photograph is licensed under “Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivative Works 2.1 Japan.”)

It’s a shame I have to be in such a rush, but I’m worried about meeting Graham on time.  Neither of us have phones that work in Japan, so it will be impossible to contact each other if we are running late. It turns out after I rush through the exhibit, it’s 4:04.  I debate whether I should do it, but I decide I can just squeeze in a visit to the Tokyo City View Observation Deck, which is on the 52nd floor.  I’m so glad I do as these are the finest, and only, views I experience while I’m in Tokyo.

Here are the views to the east.  Tokyo Tower is the red and white tower.

Tokyo City View

Tokyo City View

Tokyo City View

Tokyo City View

Tokyo City View

Tokyo City View

Tokyo City View

The observation deck seems to have a helicopter landing pad.

Tokyo City View Observation Deck

The views to the west are more hazy, as I’m facing into the sun on a hot summer day.

Tokyo City View

Tokyo City View

Tokyo City View

It’s about time for me to leave, so I take one last shot to the east and then I head downstairs.

Tokyo City View

I ask at the museum desk about the fastest way to get to the train station and the woman tells me I should catch a bus to Shibuya that takes a half-hour. I do this, and am panicking when the bus becomes stuck in a slow-moving traffic jam.  Finally, I’m let out at Shibuya Station and I am walking across Shibuya Crossing with all the crowds at 5:02, only a few minutes late!

Shibuya Crossing

Graham got to our meeting spot early, so he is starting to wonder if I’m lost, but we finally find each other and head through the streets to the Aldgate Traditional British Pub.

Shibuya

Shibuya

Shibuya

The Aldgate Traditional British Pub

At the pub, we enjoy a meal of fish and chips, draft beers, and lots of laughs, as always. Graham was supposed to bring his partner, Ako, with him this evening, but she backed out at the last-minute because she didn’t feel good. I was disappointed that I wouldn’t get to meet her.  Graham wanted to reschedule our meeting for next weekend, but as I’ll be in Nikko next weekend, we couldn’t find a time that would work.

When we leave the pub in the dark, we’re accosted by the bright lights of Shibuya.

I had never managed to see the Hachiko statue in all the times I’ve been to Shibuya, and quite by accident, I stumble upon the famous statue.  If you don’t already know the story, you can find it here.

Hachiko Statue

It’s been a long but productive day, topped off by an enjoyable evening with my good friend Graham.  I’ll certainly miss him when I go home. 🙂

Total steps today: 17,653 (7.48 miles)

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15 responses to “tokyo: mori art museum, tokyo city view, and the aldgate british pub

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  1. Interesting, but I’m not sure I understand the meaning of most of these art works. 🙂

  2. Something for everyone, Cathy 🙂 🙂

  3. That is one very large city and your photos are always so full of people. I would be bewildered there, it is much too busy for me.

  4. I like the art – the City of Towering Columns, the newspaper collages and the wind chimes. The views of the city are good too. It all sounds exhausting though!

    • It was an exhausting day, Anabel. Sometimes I just don’t know when to quit. I couldn’t really quit anyway on this day because I had to stay in the city to meet Graham. Otherwise I might have given up and gone home. In the end, I’m glad I made it to the top of the Mori Museum for that amazing city view. I enjoyed the colorful art too; and this was the only museum in Tokyo where I was allowed to take photos. 🙂

  5. My comment has vanished!

  6. No it hasn’t. Havering!

  7. These are amazing shots! I knew Tokyo was big, but through your photos it looks immense. It probably is. You make me want to visit now. 🙂 That museum sure has a variety of exhibits, all very different, yet entertaining, colorful and/or insightful.

    • Thanks so much, Liesbet. I’m sorry I’m so long to respond, but I just found your comment. Tokyo is huge! I lived in Sagamihara, outside of Tokyo, for four months and explored as much as I could in the area, but I’m sure I only touched the surface. That museum exhibit was wild!

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