meigetsu-in: the temple of the clear moon (aka the hydrangea temple)   12 comments

Saturday, June 17:  This Saturday morning, I get up early to tackle an ambitious quest. My plan is to arrive in Kita-Kamakura by 9:00, visit the Hydrangea Temple Meigetsu-in, then take the Daibutsuzaka Hiking Course to the Great Buddha of Hase, called Daibutsu. After that, I plan to go to Hasedera for the second time to hopefully make it on the hydrangea walk.

It’s a hot day today, and I have a lot of walking ahead of me. Little do I know how exhausting it will be.  I get a bit of a later start than I intend, arriving at Kita-Kamakura at around 8:45.  When I walk out of the station, the crowds are already thick.  People seem to be in some kind of slow-moving queue, but I don’t think it can be a queue for Meigetsu-in because a sign indicates it is a half kilometer away.  At a certain point the loose queue takes a sharp left at a road where the sign points to Meigetsu-in. At that time, it dawns on me that these people are in fact in a queue for the temple.  People have been walking to the right of the queue and I’ve just been happily following along.  But at the point where the road turns left, the people I’m following peel off to the right and I realize I should have been in the queue.  I hope I can just blend in and join the queue at this juncture; I keep my head down and merge in, hoping I won’t arouse anyone’s ire. The Japanese are generally too polite to say anything.  I feel bad, but there is no way I’m going to go back to the end of that queue upon my belated realization.

Still.  Even though I join the queue at this juncture, it’s still another quarter kilometer to the temple. It’s already hot and humid, and the queue is moving slowly.  I’ve come a long way and I’m not about to turn around and give up, so I will myself to be patient and just go with the flow. It’s hard!  Patience and crowd-tolerance have never been virtues of mine. 🙂

Finally, at about 9:15, I pass through the entrance to Fugenzan Meigetsu-in (福源山明月院), a Rinzai Zen temple of the Kenchō-ji school (Wikipedia: Meigetsu-in). Meigetsu-in was founded in 1160 as the Meigetsu-an (Bright Moon Hermitage) by Yamanouchi Tsunetoshi for the repose of the soul of his father Toshimichi, who died in the Battle of Heiji the previous year.  This battle was part of the struggle for power between the Taira and Minamoto clans in the late Heian Period.

Meigetsu-in, the Temple of the Clear Moon

Meigetsu-in later became part of a larger temple complex called Zenkoji, which was abolished during anti-Buddhist movements soon after the Meiji Restoration, leaving only Meigetsu-in to remain as an individual temple today (JapanGuide.com: Meigetsuin).

The main object of worship is the Kannon Bodhisattva, the deity of compassion. This bodhisattva is variably portrayed in different cultures as either female or male (from the Meigetsu-in brochure).

hydrangea at Meigetsu-in

Famous for its hydrangea that bloom during June’s rainy season, it’s also known as Ajisaidera, The Temple of Hydrangeas. About 95% of the hydrangea here are of the Hime Ajisai (“Princess Hydrangea”) variety; they are thus named because of their pretty blue colors.

hydrangea heaven

blue hydrangea

Though the hydrangeas are beautiful, I am annoyed by the crowds, which make for slow going.  It is also nearly impossible to get pictures with the hydrangeas and the temple buildings together, which is the point of coming here.  I could see hydrangeas anywhere, but to see and enjoy them in this setting, in the midst of the temple complex, is the enticement for being here. However, it’s a challenge to take photos without people in them.

I love the ema at Meigetsu-in with their painted hydrangeas.

ema at Meigetsu-in

ema at Meigetsu-in

Buddha cradling hydrangeas

hydrangea ema

The founder’s hall (Soyudo) is a thatched roof building that enshrines the temple’s founder and stores mortuary tablets of the succeeding head priests (JapanGuide.com: Meigetsuin).

Founder’s Hall (Soyudo)

water purification

hydrangea love by the Buddha

I love how the statues wear blue bibs and have hydrangeas artfully arranged around them.

hydrangeas at Meigetsu-in

Buddhist dignitaries

Buddhist dignitaries and hydrangeas

Buddhist figures

In the back of Meigetsu-in’s lush temple grounds stands the main hall (Hojo). The building features a nice circular window, which frames the scenery of the inner garden behind it. Sadly there is a huge crowd around the hall and a long queue to take a photo of the circular window.  Maybe if I have time, I can come back when hydrangea season is over and get a photo of this.

The Main Hall

The inner garden is known for its irises and is open to visitors only during two periods of about two weeks per year: in June when the irises are in bloom, and in late November/early December when the autumn colors are at their best (JapanGuide.com: Meigetsuin)

raked sand in the inner garden

pond in the inner garden

the inner garden

iris in the inner garden

irises

irises

I enjoy walking around the iris garden; I find a little waterfall on an adjacent path.

waterfall in the inner garden

From the inner garden, where the crowds are not so thick because of the additional entrance fee, I can see the round window of the Main Hall from the back side.  The round shape of the window means to be complete or perfect in Buddhist terminology.

the round window in the Main Hall – view from inner garden

the inner garden

Back in the main temple grounds, I make my way slowly to the entrance of the temple.  It’s slow going with the crowds and the many times I must stop to take photos. 🙂

There’s also a pretty bamboo grove at Meigetsu-in that towers overhead and glows in the sunlight.

bamboo forest at Meigetsu-in

bamboo looming

Oh, the hydrangeas at Meigetsu-in!  They’re so beautiful; I guess it’s no wonder Tokyo residents come out in droves to see them.

hydrangeas

hydrangeas

hydrangeas

hydrangeas

When I’m finally able to get a photo of a shrine at Meigetsu-in, there are no hydrangeas in sight!

shrine at Meigetsu-in

Due to the temple’s name’s connection to the moon (Meigetsu literally means “bright moon”; and phonetically can also mean “harvest moon”), rabbits are associated with it in relation to the Japanese folklore of a rabbit pounding a rice cake on the moon. Accordingly, rabbit designs are found on some of the temple’s decorations, while a few real rabbits are kept in cages on the temple grounds (JapanGuide.com: Meigetsuin).

rabbit at Meigetsu-in

rabbits at Meigetsu-in

At long last, I’m released from the crowds at Meigetsu-in.  Now I need to find the beginning of the Daibutsu Hiking Course, a 3km wooded trail that connects Kita-Kamakura with the Daibutsu in Hase, and passes several small, quiet temples and shrines.

 

12 responses to “meigetsu-in: the temple of the clear moon (aka the hydrangea temple)

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  1. The ajisai and irises are so pretty. Though I will be there to see the autumn leaves this year, I would love to be there in summer too after seeing this.

    • Are you not here in Japan now, Jennifer? You are lucky to be able to come in the fall. I would love to spend the fall in Japan, but I’d prefer it to be in the mountains rather than in Tokyo. The summer weather here is miserably hot, as you probably know, so it makes it a challenge to go out and explore. I don’t let it stop me, but sometimes I think I should! 🙂

      • No I’m in Malaysia now! Yes the mountains in fall is great. Was reading your recent posts. I hope you get to walk the hasedera ajisai walk one day.

      • How are you liking Malaysia, Jennifer? I did get to finally make it on the hasedera ajisai walk on Sunday, July 2, but I haven’t had time to post about it yet. I saw enough hydrangeas in June to be overdosed on hydrangeas! 🙂

  2. Just love that they have knitted blue collars to match the blue hydrangeas! I’m familiar with the blue and pink versions but haven’t seen the white ones with coloured edges. Gorgeous,

    • I loved those knitted blue collars that match the hydrangeas too, Anabel. I had never seen those white hydrangeas with colored edges either; that’s why I was so enamored with them and took so many pictures. I love how the Japanese arrange everything so neatly and precisely; I honestly am so in awe of this culture. 🙂

  3. Wow, what a beautiful display.

    • It really was wonderful, Carol, except for the hordes of people. I sure wish there were some way to visit Tokyo sights minus the crowds. Maybe if I weren’t working and could go on a weekday…. but alas, work doesn’t give me any flexibility. I have one more day of teaching on Monday; I honestly can’t wait till it’s over. 🙂 (Sorry I said Elaine in my original comment. Elaine has written about 4 comments tonight and I thought it was her commenting until I saw later it was you!)

  4. The flowers are beautiful, but it’s such a shame that the crowds were so huge.

  5. Fab, Cathy! Surrounded by beauty. 🙂 🙂 Enjoy!

    • Thanks Jo! The Japanese love their gardens and seasonal blooms so it’s fun exploring these places during blooming season, even though they’re always packed! Hope your summer is good so far! 😊

  6. A sea of irises! Wow, so beautiful. The Hydrangeas are so pretty too – you seem to have caught everything at its height of bloom. The shrinees and raked sand garden (inner garden), the bamboo forest – all jaw dropping.

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