daibutsu: the great buddha of kamakura   7 comments

Saturday, June 17: After leaving the relative serenity of the Daibutsu Hiking Course and being thrust out alongside the busy road, I stop at the first available vending machine and buy a bottle of water.  I’ve grown fond of a particular brand of flavored sweetened water, and as is usual, I get the orange flavor.  Hot, tired and parched, I gulp it down in several minutes.

By 1:00, I’m at Kotoku-in Temple and in front of the Nio-mon Gate.  Kotoku-in belongs to the traditional Buddhist Jodo Sect founded by the priest Honen (1133–1212). He was a devotee of Amitabha, Buddha of the Western Pure Land, whose vow is to liberate all beings, irrespective of sex, age or social standing, regardless of whether the individual has engaged in good or evil deeds in their lives. According to the Jodo Sect belief system, one only needs to chant the nenbutsu to receive Amitabha’s protection and be reborn in his Pure Land. The nenbutsu is “Namu Amida Butsu” (I take refuge in Amitabha Buddha). (Kotoku-in: The Teachings of Kotoku-in).

gate to Kotoku-in Temple

The main draw of Kotoku-in is the Kamakura Daibutsu, or the Great Buddha of Kamakura. A colossal copper image of Amida Buddha (the Buddha of Eternal Light), it is unusual among Japanese Buddhist statues in that it sits in the open air. Designated a National Treasure by the Japanese government, the Buddha is some 11.3 meters tall and weighs around 121 tons. Though in size it falls short of the Great Buddha of Todai-ji Temple at Nara (an image of Rushana-butsu [Vairochana Buddha]), it essentially retains its original form; as such it serves as an example of Japanese historical Buddhist art (Kotoku-in: The Great Buddha).

Directly behind the Great Buddha are the hills of the Daibutsu Hiking Course that I walked over to get here.

the Great Buddha at Hase

The Buddha sits on a lotus throne on a stone platform, holding its hands in its lap, palms upward and thumbs touching; this is the mudra (position) of “Steadfastness of Faith.”  Its serene face and half-closed eyes reveal the Buddha’s calm nature.  This serenity should be the goal of the true believer.

Daibutsu, the Great Buddha

the Great Buddha

Daibutsu

the Great Buddha

Warazori, traditional Japanese straw sandals, hang on a corridor wall facing the Great Buddha. According to Kotoku-in’s website, they were a 1951 gift from the Matsuzaka Children’s Club of Hitachi-Ota City (Ibaraki Prefecture). As Japan was still recovering from the ravages of World War II, the sandals were given with the wish that “the Great Buddha would don them to walk around Japan, bringing happiness to the people.” Since 1956, the Matsuzaka Children’s Club has continued to weave these giant warazori and present them to Kotoku-in once every three years.

Buddha’s sandals

Daibutsu

the Great Buddha

girls in yukata with the Great Buddha

lotus and Buddha

me at the Great Buddha

The Kangetsu-do Hall is believed to have been part of the imperial palace in mid-15th century Hanyang (present-day Seoul), Korea. The Hall houses a standing image of Avalokiteshvara Bodhisattva (Kannon Bosatsu), probably from the late Edo period.

Kangetsu-do Hall

Hydrangeas are all the rage here in Kamakura, and Kotoku-in is no exception.  Near the Kangetsu-do Hall are some pretty pink blooms.

hydrangea at the Great Buddha

It’s only about a 7 minute walk from the Great Buddha to Hasedera Temple, so I walk down the street to see if I can make it into the queue for the hydrangea walk. I was too late to get in the queue last Saturday because I arrived after 4:00, having visited Enoshima during the earlier part of the day. On the way, I’m enticed inside a cozy little air-conditioned ice cream shop, where I treat myself to an ice-cream cone.

The ice cream is a wonderful refreshment, as is the break from the heat.  I love the churro stuck into the ice cream; it takes me back to memories of Spain.

an ice cream treat to beat the heat

After finishing my ice cream at 2:00, I continue my walk to Hasedera Temple, where I’m certain I’ll finally get to do the hydrangea walk. 🙂

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7 responses to “daibutsu: the great buddha of kamakura

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  1. Your ice cream looks like a great way to take a rest, Cathy.

  2. He looks a bit miserable for a Buddha, but I suppose even Buddha’s allowed to be fed up sometimes. 🙂 🙂 Have a fantastic holiday, Cathy!

    • Haha, I guess the Buddha is supposed to be whatever people read him to be. I thought he looked very serene, but I can see your reading too! I’m so ready for my holiday starting Tuesday, but I’m mostly ready to go home.

  3. seeing the Kamakura Buddha surrounded by swarms of people is like a Buddhist teaching about coming back to help people (sometimes called entering the marketplace) even after you’ve achieved enlightenment, i.e. not resting there but getting back into the messy realities of everyday life. I meant to mention in the last post, the footprints you photographed – they’re a recurring theme in Buddhism across many cultures (Thai, Tibetan, etc). And now the sandals! Fun. It’s strange that the weathering and I guess the seems in the metal have conspired to give a frowning look to this Buddha. Once again, your food photos are so appealing! Love that shop and the sundae!

  4. Pingback: a second visit to the daibutsu | catbird in japan

  5. Pingback: 20. | Kamakura – IGIRISUJEN

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